Borough Profile

Borough Profile: Story of the Borough

The Borough Profile: Story of the Borough, is a short statistical overview of the people and places in our Borough.

You can also download the profile as a pdf:

More information about Cheshire West and Chester can be found in the Joint Strategic Needs Assessment (JSNA) sections population, starting well (children and young people information), living well, working well, aging well and residents views.

Introduction to Cheshire West and Chester

Cheshire West and Chester Council was created in 2009 following a review of local government. The Local Authority covers approximately 350 square miles and is the fourth largest unitary authority in the North West. The Borough includes the historic city of Chester and the industrial and market towns of Ellesmere Port, Frodsham, Helsby, Malpas, Neston, Northwich and Winsford; as well as a patchwork of rural villages. Around 340,500 people live in Cheshire West and about a third live in rural areas.

Borough profile map.png

Key messages

The population is forecast to increase by about 10% to 367,000 by 2035. Older age groups will see the biggest increase, with the number of residents aged 65 plus expected to increase by 46% and the numbers of people aged 85 and over forecast to more than double.

Quality of life is generally good for many people across the Borough, with lower levels of deprivation, higher incomes and generally good health. However, there are pockets of significant disadvantage, where residents experience poorer health outcomes, living conditions, educational attainment and economic prospects.

Local population

  • ​Cheshire West and Chester’s population is increasing. The 2018 mid-year population estimate is 340,500. This is 11,100 higher than in 2008 [Ref1].
  • The current estimated population includes:
    • 61,000 children aged 0-15
    • 206,500 people of working age (16-64)
    • 72,900 older people aged 65 and above.
  • Between mid-year 2017 and 2018 there were around 3,400 live births in Cheshire West and Chester and 3,500 deaths [Ref2].
  • Around 18,900 people moved in to Cheshire West and Chester and 16,400 moved out [Ref2].


  • The population is forecast to increase by around 10% to almost 367,000 by 2035 [Ref3].
  • The greatest increase will be in the number of residents aged 65 plus which is expected to increase by 46% to over 100,000 by 2035. The number of people aged 85 and over is forecast to more than double to 20,000 [Ref3]. 
  • At the time of the last Census in 2011 [Ref4], 5% of the population (17,600) were Black and Minority Ethnic residents.

Ref1: ONS  mid-year population estimates, Office for National Statistics licensed under the Open Government Licence v.3.0
Ref2: 2018 mid-year estimates (components of population change for local authorities in the UK, mid-2018), Office for National Statistics licensed under the Local Government Licence v.3.0
Ref3: 2015 based population forecasts, Insight and Intelligence, Cheshire West and Chester Council
Ref4: 2011 Census, Office for National Statistics licensed under the Open Government Licence v.3.0

Inequality and deprivation

  • In 2018/19, West Cheshire Foodbank provided 9,651 three day emergency food parcels to local people. 3,552 of the recipients were children [Ref5].
  • In 2016, 12.7% (7,300) of children aged under 16 were living in poverty, compared to 17.0% nationally. However, at a very local level some small neighbourhood areas record rates of child poverty of at least 35% [Ref6].
  • 11.3% of households in the borough are living in fuel poverty [Ref7].
  • Cheshire West and Chester has been identified as a coldspot for youth social mobilty, and ranks among the worst 10% of local authorities [Ref8].
  • Cheshire West and Chester ranks 183rd out of 317 local authorities in England in terms of deprivation (using the rank of average rank measure) [Ref9].
  • 16 neighbourhoods rank in the 10% most deprived in England. Around 24,000 residents live in these areas. This is an increase from 14 neighbourhood areas ranked in the most deprived decile in 2015 [Ref9].
  • Two neighbourhoods are ranked in the 2% most deprived in England. One in Lache ward and one in Winsford Over and Verdin ward. Around 2,900 residents live in these areas of Cheshire West and Chester [Ref9].

Ref5: New end of year statistics, 29th April 2019, West Cheshire Foodbank
Ref6: Personal tax credits: children in low-income families local measure: 2016 snapshot at 31 August 2016
Ref7: Sub regional fuel poverty 2018 (2016 data), Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy 
Ref8: State of the Nation 2017, Social Mobility Commission, 28 November 2017
Ref9: Indices of Multiple Deprivation 2019, Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government

Education

  • ​In 2018, 71.8% of five year olds achieved a good level of development, similar to the England average of 71.5% [Ref10].
  • At key stage two, 64% of pupils achieved the expected standard or above in reading, writing and maths, lower than the England average of 65% (2019 provisional) [Ref11].
  • In 2018, the average attainment 8 score per pupil was 46.4, higher than the England average of 44.5. Progress 8 scores show that pupils in Cheshire West and Chester scored 0.11 points below the average progression for England [Ref12].
  • 13.4% of primary school pupils and 11.8% of secondary school pupils are eligible for and claiming free school meals (2019) [Ref13].
  • Almost one in six (8,472) pupils have a special educational need (2019). Of these, 1,703 (20%) have a Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP) [Ref14].
  • Children facing disadvantage perform significantly worse than their peers including looked after children, children in need, those on free school meals and those with a special educational need [Ref15].
Ref10: Early years foundation stage profile results 2017 to 2018, Department for Education
Ref11: National curriculum assessments key stage 2 2019 provisional, Department for Education
Ref12: Statistics - GCSEs key stage four, Department for Education 2018 LA tables
Ref13: Schools, pupils and their characteristics January 2019, Department for Education Table 4c
Ref14: Special educational needs in England January 2019, Department for Education LA tables 12 and 13 Ref15: Local Authority Interactive Tool, accessed September 2019, Department for Education

Skills and employment

  • ​In Cheshire West and Chester, nearly 1 in 13 of the working age population (aged 16-64) have no qualifications (7.3% in Cheshire West and Chester, 7.6% in England). 43.8% have a Level four qualification or above (degree or equivalent), higher than the England rate of 38.3% [Ref16].
  • In 2019, the percentage of young people aged 16-17 who are not in education, employment or training (NEET) or not known is 2.7% (170 young people). This is lower than the national average of 5.5% [Ref17].
  • The current employment rate is 75.6% (April 2018 - March 2019) this represents around 155,900 residents aged 16 to 64 and is the same as the England rate of 75.6% [Ref16].
  • More than a fifith (22.7%) of residents in employment work part time [Ref16].
  • The industries with the highest number of employees include retail (20,000 employees), health (19,000), professional, scientific and technical (18,000) and manufacturing (15,000) [Ref18].
  • The manufacturing industry makes up 22.3% of gross value added (GVA) in Cheshire West and Chester [Ref19].
  • The 2018 median gross weekly earnings for residents in full time employment are £562.20, lower than the England median of £574.90 [Ref20].

Ref16: Annual population Survey (APS) (April 2018 - March 2019). Office for National Statistics licensed under the Open Government Licence v.3.0.
Ref17: 16 to 17 year olds recorded in education and training and NEET by local authority 2019, (average of December 18, January 19 and February 19), Department of Education
Ref18: Workplace based employment by industry (SIC 2007), 2017, Business Register and Employment Survey (BRES), Office for National Statistics licensed under the Open Government Licence v.3.0.
Ref19: Regional Gross Value Added (Income Approach) by industry (2017), Office for National Statistics licensed under the Open Government Licence v.3.0.
Ref20: ONS annual survey of hours and earnings - resident analysis ONS Crown Copyright Reserved [from Nomis on 24 September2019]

Health and wellbeing - Adults

  • ​The 2011 Census found that 81.6% of people were in very good or good health [Ref4] .
  • Life expectancy at birth for men is 79.9 years, just above the national average of 79.6 years.  For women, it is 82.8 years compared to the England average of 83.1 years (2015-17) [Ref21].
  • People in Cheshire West and Chester can expect to spend a higher proportion of their lives in good health than the England average and fewer years spent in poor health. The number of years spent in “not good” health is 13 years for men compared to 16.2 years for England, and 17.7 years for women compared to 19.3 years for England [Ref21].
  • Those living in more deprived areas have significantly lower life expectancy. The inequality gap in life expectancy at birth is widest for men at 10.4 years. The gap for women is 9.1 years [Ref21].
  • Cancer and heart disease are the key diseases that contribute to inequalities for both men and women. Coronary heart disease (CHD) deaths make the biggest difference for men and lung cancer for women [Ref22].
  • Smoking levels have fallen markedly in recent decades and are below the England average; however 13.8% of Cheshire West and Chester’s adults are smokers [Ref23]. 78% of residents feel stop smoking initiatives are well promoted locally [Ref24].
  • Around one in five adults are not physically active; 19.7% compared to 22.2% in England [Ref25]. 68% of residents feel keeping active initiatives are well promoted in the area [Ref24].
  • 63.5% of adults are estimated to be overweight or obese (62.0% in England) [Ref26]. Two thirds of residents (64%) feel that healthy weight initiatives are well promoted [Ref24].
  • In Cheshire West and Chester, 29% of residents drink at levels that could harm their health, similar to the England average [Ref27]. 72% of residents feel that responsible drinking initiatives are well promoted [Ref24].
  • Around 1,300 people aged 18 and over have a moderate or severe learning disability[Ref28].
  • 10 small neighbourhood areas in Cheshire West and Chester are predicted to have amongst the highest levels of loneliness for older people in England and Wales [Ref29].
  • The number of people with dementia in Cheshire West and Chester is forecast to increase from around 4,900 in 2015 to around 8,700 in 2035 [Ref30].
  • At the time of the 2011 Census [Ref4], 11.3% (37,121) of people said they provided more than one hour unpaid care per week, with around 8,500 providing more than 50 hours per week.
  • 3.4% of the adult population is in contact with secondary mental health services, lower than the England rate (5.4) [Ref30].
  • One in six adults aged 16 and over in England report experiencing symptoms of a common mental health disorder. This is over 46,000 adults in Cheshire West and Chester [Ref31].
  • Using the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being scale, the mental well-being score for residents has improved slightly from 25.4 in 2011 to 26 in 2017 [Ref24].
  • Locally, 88.2% of adults with a learning disability live in their own home, or with their family. This is in line with the North West average and above the national average (77.2%) [Ref32].
  • Cheshire West and Chester council provided Adult Social Care services to 6,791 people aged 18 and over from 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018.  2,057 people between the ages 18 – 64 and for a further 4,734 who were over 65 years old [Ref33].
  • Cheshire West and Chester supported approximately 4,085 adults in 2017/2018 to manage their own support as much as they wish, so they are in control of what, how and when support is delivered to match their needs[Ref34].

Ref4: 2011 Census, Office for National Statistics licensed under the Open Government Licence v.3.0
Ref21: Public Health Outcomes Framework 2019, Public Health England
Ref22: Mortality and Life Expectancy JSNA, November 2017, Cheshire West and Chester Joint Strategic Needs Assessment
Ref23: Smoking prevalence in adults (APS) – current smokers (2018), Local Tobacco Control Profiles, Public Health England
Ref24: Your Voice Matters Residents Survey 2017, Insight and Intelligence, Cheshire West and Chester Council
Ref25: Percentage of physically inactive adults, 2017/18, Public Health Outcomes Framework, Public Health England
Ref26: Percentage of adults aged 18+classified as overweight or obese (current method), 2017/18, Public Health Outcomes Framework, Public Health England
Ref27: Local Alcohol Consumption Survey, 2015, Public Health England
Ref28: Learning disability (2019) - Projecting Adult Needs and Service Information, Oxford Brookes University and Institute of Public Care
Ref29: Predictions of loneliness for older people, Cheshire West and Chester JSNA, Davidson, S, Rossall, P (2015). Evidence Review: Loneliness in Later Life, Age UK.
Ref30: 2015-based Dementia forecasts, Insight and Intelligence, Cheshire West and Chester Council
Ref31: 2014 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey, NHS Digital
Ref32: Measures from the adult social care outcomes framework, England 2017-18, ASCOF 1G
Ref33: Adult social care activity and finance report, England 2017-18, tables LTS001a and STS001
Ref34: Adult social care activity and finance report, England 2017-18, tables LTS001a

   

 

Health and wellbeing - Children

  • ​In 2018/19, 41.5% of babies in Cheshire West and Chester were either fully or partially breastfed at their six to eight week check [Ref35]. This is an increase from 40.1% in 2017/18 but remains significantly lower than the England average (46.2% in 2018/19).
  • One in five children (19.8%) in their school reception year are overweight or obese, this is significantly better than the England average of 22.4% [Ref36].
  • One in three (31.9%) of children aged 10-11 (year six) are overweight or obese, this is significantly better than the England average of 34.3% [Ref37].
  • An estimated 13.1% of 0-24 year olds have a mental health disorder. The most common mental health problems among children and young people are conduct disorder, emotional disorders (anxiety and depression) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)/ hyperkinetic disorders [Ref38].
  • Hospital admission rates for both mental health conditions and self-harm were significantly higher for children and young people in Cheshire West and Chester compared to the England average in 2017/18 [Ref40].
  • Within Cheshire West and Chester, there are around 2,300 children of our 0-17 population who are considered as ‘Children in Need’ and receiving services from Children’s Social Care. Rates are in line with the national average, with 341.1 per every 10,000 children in the borough being defined a Child in Need, against the England rate of 341.0 [Ref15].
  • Of Cheshire West and Chester’s Children in Need, 215 children were on a Child Protection Plan and 496 children were within the Local Authority’s care (2017/18) [Ref15].
  • Cheshire West and Chester has committed to embed common early help assessments across all local public agencies, so as to provide more joined up and consistent approach to agencies. 795 TAFs (Team around the Family) were opened by partner agencies during 2017/18, including 88 by Health and 678 by Schools. A further 595 children were opened to TAF by the Local Authority’s Early Help and Prevention Service in the same period [Ref41].
  • Around a quarter of all contacts into Children’s Social Care and Early Help are for the reason of domestic abuse [Ref42]. This reflects the strong commitment to the model by Police, domestic abuse and adult professionals.

 Ref15: Local Authority Interactive Tool, accessed September 2019, Department for Education
Ref35: Breastfeeding data 2018/19, Insight and Intelligence, Cheshire West and Chester Council
Ref36: Child excess weight in 4-5 year olds, National Child Measurement Programme - England, 2017/18 [NS], NHS digital
Ref37: Child excess weight in 10-11 year olds, National Child Measurement Programme - England, 2017/18 [NS], NHS digital
Ref38: Children and young people’s mental health (2016), Cheshire West and Chester Joint Strategic Needs Assessment
Ref39: Self-Injury JSNA (2016), Cheshire West and Chesters Joint Strategic Needs Assessment
Ref40: Child and Maternal Health Profile, accessed September 2019, Public Health England
Ref41: Team Around the Family, July 2018, Insight and Intelligence, Cheshire West and Chester Council
Ref42: Contacts into children’s Social Care and Early Help, March 2018, Insight and Intelligence, Cheshire West and Chester Council

Satistfaction with the local area

  • In the 2017 Residents Survey, 84% of local people were satisfied with their local area as a place to live [Ref24], which is in line with the Community Survey 2011 figures.
  • 18% of residents felt their local area had improved in the last three years, a rise from 16% in 2011. This figure rose to 23% for residents of Northwich and Winsford [Ref24]. [Note in 2011 the question was based on previous two years rather than three years].
  • The top three issues cited by residents as presenting a problem that affects their quality of life are knowing what services are available to them (50%), knowing what benefits they are entitled to (45%) and being able to get to the GP (38%) [Ref24].
  • In a 2017 business survey, 69% of businesses cited ‘overall attractiveness of the area’ in their top three benefits of being located where they are in Cheshire West and Chester [Ref43].

Ref24: Your Voice Matters Residents Survey 2017, Insight and Intelligence, Cheshire West and Chester Council
Ref43: Cheshire Business Survey 2017, Cheshire West and Chester, Cheshire East and BMG Research

Housing

  • ​In 2017, there were 157,920 dwellings in Cheshire West and Chester and an estimated 145,700 households.  85% of dwellings are privately owned [Ref44].
  • Almost a third of households (30%) are single person households [Ref45].
  • The average property price in the borough at July 2019 is £210,023, an increase of almost £7,000 in the 12 month period. This is lower than the average UK property price of £232,710 [Ref46].
  • The average monthly rent for a ‘room’ in the private rental market is £390 compared to £411 in England [Ref47].
  • At 1 April 2018 there were 6,204 applicants registered on our housing waiting list, showing the extent of local demand for social rented housing [Ref48].
  • At October 2018, there were 4,413 empty homes in the borough, 1,630 of which have been empty for more than six months [Ref49].  The Council aims to bring 900 empty homes back into use by 2021 [Ref50].
  • Over the eight years from 2010-2018, on average around 1,400 new homes a year were built, with 28% being affordable housing (390 units per annum) [Ref51].
  • At least 1,100 new homes will be built each year until 2030 [Ref51].
  • The borough’s housing stock is in relatively good condition; 80% of the borough’s private homes meet the decent homes standard, compared to 75% of all private dwellings in England. However, rates of disrepair are above the national average and are increasing, 13% of homes in the borough fail the repair requirement of the Decent Homes Standard compared to 5.5% [Ref52].
  • 22% of all private sector households (26,200 households) are classed as vulnerable households and a quarter of vulnerable households (7,300 households) live in non-decent homes [Ref52].
  • Highest levels of non-decency are in rural wards, pre 1919 housing stock, converted flats, and the private rented sector [Ref52].
  • 94% of residents believe their home meets their needs and those of their family [Ref24].

Ref24: Your Voice Matters Residents Survey 2017, Insight and Intelligence, Cheshire West and Chester Council
Ref44: Table 100: Dwelling stock: Number of dwellings by tenure and district 2001 – 2017, Table 100 Dwelling stock: Number of Dwellings by Tenure and district, England; 2018, HCLG
Ref45: Households (2018) 2016-based Household Projections, HCLG
Ref46: UK House Price Index, July 2019, Land Registry
Ref47: Private rental market summary statistics: April 2018 to March 2019, Valuation Office Agency
Ref48: Numbers of households on local authorities' housing waiting lists – Table 615, October 2017, DCLG
Ref49: All vacant dwellings by local authority district – Table 615, October 2017, DCLG
Ref50: Cheshire West and Chester Empty Homes Strategy 2016-2021
Ref51: Local Plan Annual Monitoring Report, 2018, Cheshire West and Chester Council
Ref52: Home Assistance Policy 2014/2018, Strategic Housing and Commissioning, Cheshire West and Chester Council

Business and the economy

  • There are over 14,060 businesses [Ref53] - that employ over 177,700 people in Cheshire West and Chester [Ref16].
  • In 2017 there were 1,705 business start-ups [Ref53].  
  • The level of gross value added (GVA) in Cheshire West is £10,092 million [Ref54].
  • Around a third of residents don’t know what impact Brexit will have on themselves (30%) or their local area (35%). 21% feel that it will have a positive impact on themselves and 18% on the local area. 33% feel that ‘Brexit’ will have a negative impact on both. The remaining residents feel there will be no impact either on themselves (16%) or the local area (14%) [Ref24].
  • A greater proportion of residents (54%) feel they are benefitting from regeneration across Cheshire West and Chester than in their local area (45%) [Ref24].
  • Over half of residents (52%) believe that the local economy as stayed the same over the last three years [Ref24].
  • In 2017, 25% of Cheshire West businesses say they have increased the size of their workforce in the last 12 months, compared to 17% 2011 [Ref43]. 48% of businesses had vacancies in the past 12 months, 19% were ‘hard to fill’ [Ref43].

Ref16: Annual population Survey (APS) (April 2018-March 2019). Office for National Statistics licensed under the Open Government Licence v.3.0.
Ref24: Your Voice Matters Residents Survey 2017, Insight and Intelligence, Cheshire West and Chester Council
Ref43: Cheshire Business Survey 2017, Cheshire West and Chester, Cheshire East and BMG Research
Ref53: Business demography (2017)and UK business counts (2018) from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0
Ref54: Regional fross value added (balanced approach) (GVA, 2017), Office for National Statistics (ONS) licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0.

Environment

  • There is 433 kilograms of residual household waste per household in Cheshire West and Chester compared to 543 kilograms in England [Ref55].
  • ​58.25% of household waste is sent for reuse, recycling or composting compared to 43.21% in England [Ref55].
  • The Council's 2018-19 performance measures around 'cleaner streets' show that performance on fly-tipping is improving and is better than target. Performace on maintaining clean neighbourhoods has declined both in terms of litter and detritus and grounds maintenance [Ref56].
  • Borough wide C02 emissions for 2017-18 were 39.85% lower than they were in 1990, when 6,658 kilo tonnes of C02 was produced. However, this reflects a small increase on 2016-17 [Ref57].
  • In 2014-15 Cheshire West and Chester Council was responsible for emitting 45,543 tonnes of C02. By 2017-18 this had fallen to 33,405 tonnes of C02 [Ref58].
  • Household waste collection and the disposal of non-recyclable household waste contributes 39.5% of the Council's carbon emissions [Ref59].
  • Industrial and commercial activities are the main producer of C02 emissions, releasing 62.9% of the borough's total. In the rest of England, industrial and commercial activities only account for around 38% of carbon dioxide [Ref60].


Ref55: LG Inform 2017-18 council performance benchmarks
Ref56: 2018-19 Year-End Review of Council Plan Performance, Cheshire West and Chester Council
Ref57: 2018-19 Mid-Year Review of Council Plan Performance, Cheshire West and Chester Council
Ref58: CW&C Greenhouse Gas Emissions Annual Report 2017-8
Ref59: CW&C Carbon Management Plan 2016-2020
Ref60: Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, UK local authority and regional carbon dioxide emissions national statistics: 2005 to 2017

Transport and connectivity

  • ​Superfast broadband has been rolled out across the borough with 95.3% of premises able to access broadband with speeds greater than 30 Mbps [Ref56].
  • 95% of businesses in Cheshire West say they had access to the Internet in 2017, with 50% having access to superfast Broadband [Ref43].
  • 81% of households have at least one car or van (74% in England and Wales) [Ref4].
  • 74% of our employed residents travel to work by car (63% in England and Wales) [Ref4].
  • At the time of the 2011 Census [Ref4], around 51,000 people travelled into the Borough to work and 52,800 travelled out.  Commuting resulted in a population decrease of 1,800 in Cheshire West and Chester. The highest inflow of workers was from Flintshire and the highest out flow travelled to Cheshire East.
  • 16% of residents say that transport issues prevents them from participating in activities more often [Ref24].
  • 1% of 'A' roads should have been considered for maintenance in 2017/18 (this is lower than the 3% for England as a whole) [Ref61].
  • During 2015-17, there were 417 people killed or seriously injured on the roads, a rate of 41.4 per 100,000 which is higher than the England average of 40.8 per 100,000 [Ref62].
  • In the 2017 Resident’s Survey [Ref24], the condition of local roads was seen as one of the most important factors in making somewhere a good place to live but reported the lowest satisfaction score.  The Council’s 2018-19 performance measures however shows that the targets set for the condition of all types of road in Cheshire West and Chester are being achieved [Ref56].
  • 64% of residents are satisfied with the accessibility of buses for wheelchairs and pushchairs.  The biggest cause of dissatisfaction around bus services is the cost of fares, with 39% dissatisfied with this in their local area [Ref24].

Ref4: 2011 Census, Office for National Statistics licensed under the Open Government Licence v.3.0
Ref24: Your Voice Matters Residents Survey 2017, Insight and Intelligence, Cheshire West and Chester Council
Ref43: Cheshire Business Survey 2017, Cheshire West and Chester, Cheshire East and BMG Research
Ref56: 2018-19 Year-End Review of Council Plan Performance, Cheshire West and Chester Council
Ref61: Table RDC0120, Department for Transport Statistics, licensed under the Open Government Licence v.3.0
Ref62: Road accidents and safety statistics, Department for Transport (taken from Public Health Outcomes Framework)

Crime

  • ​The total number of recorded crimes (excluding fraud) in Cheshire West and Chester is 28,935 in 2018-19 [Ref63].
  • In Cheshire West and Chester in 2018-19, the most common offence was a public order offence, violence without injury, violence with injury, and criminal damage and arson [Ref63].
  • Between 2017-18 and 2018-19 the largest increase in number of offences is for stalking and harassment, violence without injury and robbery. The greatest decreases are for drug offences, burglary and domestic burglary and bicycle theft [Ref63].
  • Improved Resident Survey [Ref24] results were recorded in 2017 regarding crime and anti-social behaviour. The 2017 survey found 94% feel safe in the daytime, and 61% at night, an increase from the 2011 Community Survey.

Ref24: Your Voice Matters Residents Survey 2017, Insight and Intelligence, Cheshire West and Chester Council
Ref63: Crime in England and Wales, year ending March 2019. Office for National Statistics licensed under the Open Government Licence v.3.0.

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